Meet the Member Owen Archibald

by Rodeo News

story by Riata Cummings

Owen Archibald is a 17-year-old rodeo athlete and senior at Skyview High School. He enjoys his history and government classes, and after high school, he is planning to attend a university on a rodeo scholarship with a political science major. Owen is the son of Jed and Cindy Archibald of Smithfield, Utah, and he has two older sisters: Lindsey and Emma. He has always admired his older sisters, aspiring to mimic Emma’s desire for knowledge and Lindsey’s passion in the arena. Owen’s family has always been supportive of his love of rodeo and is what he describes as a “push” family, always encouraging him to do and be better.
Owen was 8 years old when he decided he wanted to rope. Shortly thereafter he competed in a youth rodeo at the Legacy Events Center finishing 2nd in the breakaway roping. He currently competes in the team roping and tiedown roping and loves life if there is a rope in his hand. Owen qualified for the National Junior High School Finals Rodeo, he is a three-time Silver State International Rodeo qualifier and a two-time Panguitch Invitational champion header. This year he is heading for Rhett Nebeker, and Owen has placed in the top 10 for at least one of his events in each of the first four rodeos this season. He has set a goal to become the state champion header and a national qualifier in both events stating that this year “consistency is key”.
Owen competes on a palomino reining turned heading horse named Tuff who, “has a lot of pull and so much try.” After his new calf horse bowed and tore a tendon, Owen resumed tiedown roping off Muffin, a bay that he has been roping on since he started his rodeo career. Owen practices every day. “If I’m not out there working, someone else is, and they will beat me if I’m not prepared. So, I go out there and I practice.” He lives by the saying, “No matter how you feel, get up, dress up, show up and never give up.” He says, “This is always in the back of my mind and I think about the people that will surpass me if I don’t keep improving. Even when it’s rainy or snowy or I don’t feel well I get up and rope so that I am prepared for those situations at the rodeo.”
Rodeo has allowed Owen to develop lasting relationships with his fellow competitors. He said, “I love it when people ask me to push their calf or tail their steer because I know that when the situation is reversed when I need help, I’ll have a million friends willing to help me.” Owen loves that rodeo teaches athletes to respect one another and to develop personal and social responsibility. He would advise rodeo rookies to work with whatever equipment or talent that they have because “everyone starts somewhere. Prepare yourself mentally, get out there, give it a try and don’t give up.”

                © Rodeo Life Media Corporation | All Rights Reserved • Laramie, Wyoming • 307.761.9053

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